Garmin Remote Worker Navigation, Messaging & SOS

Garmin Remote Worker

Garmin Remote Worker Solution, the Explorer, provides an affordable tracking and communication device. The Explorer is an adaptation developed from Garmin’s recent acquisition of InReach. Garmin has taken the device and made it better. The Explorer provides some great features for workers in remote areas which are navigating off the beaten road and need a safety and communication tool using satellite communication instead of cellular. Read more.

 

Garmin Remote Worker Device GIF

Return on Investment Series: Proactively Manage Driver Behavior

Fleet Savings Summary

The Fleet Savings Summary Report highlights your fleets top five most valuable driver coaching opportunities by vehicle. These drivers can be interpreted as the fleets most costly drivers of spending, and therefore represent the best bang for your buck driver coaching opportunities. Driver behavior can be critical to the operations of your vehicles.

Proactive management is key. Aberdeen Group reports that top performing organizations are 96% more likely than their peers to utilize technology that alerts management, and the driver, of exceptions being made (i.e., speeding, harsh cornering, etc).

 

Conclusion

Today’s fleet managers are under extreme pressure to manage their fleet costs despite deteriorating economic conditions. These costs include the procurement and disposal of the vehicles, fixed and variable operating costs, labor costs, as well as collision and insurance claims.

Using telematics data, fleet managers can discover new cost savings opportunities across their entire fleet. By pursuing these savings opportunities, a fleet manager can reduce their COI, improve their fleets operating efficiency, and grow their bottom line. Conversely, managing a fleet without a telematics platform is likely to result in higher costs and poor visibility for improvement.

Telematics and the Fleet Savings Summary are valuable tools that fleet managers should use to better understand and proactively manage their vehicles and drivers, and ultimately run a more profitable fleet.

Click here to request more information.

 

 

 

 

Return on Investment Series: Identify Key Opportunities for Cost Savings

Identify Key Opportunities for Cost Savings

In this fourth part of our ROI/COI blog, we will discuss specific telematics related cost savings categories that compile our Fleet Savings Summary Report.

#1 Safety: Reducing costly vehicle collisions

The U.S. Occupational Health & Safety Administration (OSHA) reports the following figures:

Cost Savings

 

Collisions, speeding, and aggressive driving behaviors were found to be a contributing factor in 31% of all fatal crashes, while seat belt use was found to decrease the risk of a fatality by between 45-60%. With this knowledge and the use of our telematics program, fleet managers can improve profitability by monitoring driver behaviors and proactively coaching drivers.

Other in-cab driver feedback tools such as GO TALK and real-time audible alerts can drastically reduce the likelihood of an on-duty accident. This can also be quantified in a reduction to insurance costs. To quantify these savings, the Fleet Savings Summary Report uses a proprietary safety-scoring algorithm to determine the existing and potential savings for a fleet.

 

#2 Fuel: Controlling Runaway Fuel Cost Savings

Managing fuel costs can be complicated and involve a number of variable, including fluctuating gas prices and inconsistent driver behavior. For many fleets, fuel is one for the largest expenses.

Fact: The U.S. Department of Energy reports that rapid acceleration and heavy braking can reduce fuel economy by up to 33% for highway driving and 5% on city roads. Idling and speeding can also have drastic impacts on MPG.

Market research has shown that the effective use of telematics has an effect on fuel cost savings by as much as 14%. Driver coaching is instrumental in achieving these cost reductions. For every 5 mph over 50 mph, a driver can reduce their MPG by approximately 7-14%. Therefore, getting drivers to slow down and observe the speed limit translates into saved money.

The Fleet Savings Summary Reports uses a proprietary fuel-scoring algorithm to determine a fleets existing and potential fuel-related savings. In doing so, driver speeding incidents and idle time were found to be the largest contributor to fuel waste, which resulted in fuel-related savings.

 

#3 Maintenance: Reducing Planned and Unplanned Repair and Maintenance

We all know that preventative maintenance is a regular part of owning a vehicle, but additional repairs due to aggressive driving and vehicle misuses are an unnecessary cost to a fleet. Particularly, harsh accelerations, harsh cornering, and harsh braking cause harmful wear and tear on critical vehicle components. This drastically increases a vehicles variable CpM.

The results materialize as reduced tire life, reduced brake life, more frequent scheduled maintenance and more frequent non- scheduled maintenance and repair. In fact, these non-scheduled maintenance interruptions can result in lost profits of between $400 to $700 per day, in addition to the cost of repairs.

The Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) reports that telematics technology can help a company reduce maintenance and repair cost by as much as 14%. Because much of these savings are tied to driver behavior, using real-time driver management tools and in-cab alerts are the best way to minimize unnecessary wear and tear on your fleet vehicles.

By managing the aggressive driving behaviors, fleet managers can minimize their maintenance repair costs, in in turn generate savings reflected in the Fleet Savings Summary Report in the Maintenance section.

 

#4 Productivity: Increasing Work Efficiency

Driver compensation is often a large portion of a fleets operating budget. That being said, labor can be very expensive for fleet managers. Among the many ways to calculate labor productivity, vehicle idle time is an important metric. Even though idle time only captures a component of employee productivity, it is the only metric that the Fleet Savings Summary Report utilizes for its productivity-based scoring algorithm at this time.

Market research suggests that telematics can increase workforce productivity and reduce labor costs by up to 12%.14 This allows companies to make more customer stops and cut out unproductive mileage. The net effect is higher revenues and lower costs.

Using the Fleet Savings Summary Reports proprietary productivity-based scoring algorithm, this increase in workforce productivity translates into productivity-related saving. To maximize these savings, fleet managers must limit their fleets idle labor, which is approximated using vehicle idle hours per trip.

I know we said this was going to be a 4-part series but there is so much great information to offer that we have added a 5th part. In the next series we will discuss how to proactively manage driver behavior. Putting all these steps into place to maximize your ROI and decrease your COI!

Click here to request more information.

 

Top 10 Most Common Unsafe Driving Violations

J.J. Keller’s List of Unsafe Driving Violations

Let’s talk about safety. J. J. Keller notes the Top 10 CSA unsafe driving violations. The FMCSA is an organization of authority in the industry. Paying attention to these scores is essential to operations.

 

No. 1: Speeding

Speeding violations range in severity from 1-10 dependent on speed and location. Speeding 1 encompasses speeding 1-5 mph above posted speed limit. Levels 2 and 3 are reserved for speeds 6-10 mph and 11-14 mph, respectively. Level 10 severity speeding violations include speeds 15 mph in excess of posted speed limit, and any speeding in construction zones. All of these speeding violations will affect your driver’s CSA score. Keep an eye out for excessive speed behaviors to protect your business!

 

No. 2: Failing to use a seat belt

This violation is an automatic level 7 for severity. Such a simple, life saving device, yet 2009 racked up over 70,000 of these violations. Failure to wear a seat belt not only affects your driver CSA score, but risks lives in the process.

 

No. 3: Failing to obey a traffic control device

We’re looking at a level 5 offense here. Failure to obey a traffic control device is a general category encompassing running stop signs, red lights, passing in a no-passing zone, and all other ignorance to road signage.

How can you avoid these violations? Simple. Make sure your drivers know the rules of the road and maintain awareness. This means limiting fatigued drivers, in addition to continuing education courses.

 

No. 4: Following too close

Categorized within “dangerous driving” this level 5 offense can be a deadly offense, and the CSA looks at it that way too. According to the FMCSA, “If you are driving below 40 mph, you should leave at least one second for every 10 feet of vehicle length… For speeds over 40 mph, you should leave one additional second”.

Watch: Dangers of Following too Closely

 

No. 5: Improper lane change

This is an automatic level 5 offense. An improper lane change is when a person changes or attempts to change lanes without an open and clear path. Essentially, it’s cutting someone off.

It’s very difficult to receive a citation for this because it requires one of two things. Either an officer has to witness to the improper lane change, or an accident resulting from the lane change with witnesses. Even with this being the case, there were still over 11,000 citations in 2009.

 

No. 6: Using/equipping a CMV with a radar detector

This level 5 offense is considered highly illegal. This is primarily because it endangers other drivers on the road. Not only is speeding dangerous overall, but speeding in a CMV can be especially dangerous because of the size of the vehicle, or the cargo. In particular, semi-truck tires are not rated for speeds above 75 mph, which means speed can lead to a dangerous blowout.

Using radar detectors is a practice that enables speeding in locations not currently under monitor.

 

No. 7: Failure to yield right of way

Failure to yield the right of way is a level 5 offense. It is considering a dangerous driving offense, and also negatively affects your driver’s CSA score. This includes intersections, multi-way stops, pedestrians, and other traffic signage. Violations can be a result of ignorance or confusion, but either way you can control violations to the law through driver education and coaching.

Unnecessarily yielding right of way can be just as dangerous, because it is often the cause of confusion.

 

No. 8: Improper turns

Improper turns are categorized under level 5 severity. This violation includes failing to make a complete stop before a right on red, improper distance from roadside when performing a turn, not utilizing turn signals, and improperly executed u-turns. Behaviors resulting in an improper turn violation also result in an impact on driver CSA score.

 

No. 9: Improper passing

Improper passing can be very unsafe. It includes endangering other vehicles while passing, blind passing at the tops of hills or around curves, and passing on the right. These behaviors result in high-speed, deadly accidents. As such, the severity level is 5, and it will absolutely impact driver CSA score.

This violation can also be issued when passing in a passing lane, or illegally crossing designated lane boundaries to pass another vehicle. In the case of most CMVs, size generally prohibits these behaviors.

 

No. 10: Reckless driving

Reckless driving is a major moving traffic violation. It ranks a level 10 on the severity index, and can result in the revocation of a license or jail time. It includes driving 25 mph over the speed limit, street racing, eluding a police officer, and even passing when visibility is limited.

Clearly, this would impact CSA score, but beyond that, it can severely damage your company’s reputation. When a potential customer sees your company vehicle weaving between lanes of traffic, they lose trust in your professional image.

 

Avoiding unsafe driving violations

The easiest way to avoid unsafe driving violations is to educate your drivers. Knowing the rules of the road can really make an impact on your driver CSA score. Abiding by the rules will eliminate the likelihood of receiving any violations at all.

Other ways to avoid violations:

  1. Stay alert
  2. Wear your seat belt
  3. Drive defensively
  4. Participate in NSC training
  5. Utilize driver coaching plug-ins

Read more about plug-ins and driver coaching here.

Return on Investment Series: Fleet Savings Summary

What is the Fleet Savings Summary Report?

The Fleet Savings Summary Report is a snapshot of existing versus potential savings for your fleet. These savings were determined through the use of proprietary driver scoring algorithms.

 

Fleet Savings Summary

Report Overview

 

To calculate a fleets existing and potential telematics-related savings, a detailed breakdown of its operating costs are required. Geotab conducted a combination of primary and secondary North American market research to develop fleet-specific Cost-per-Mile (CpM) models, including sub-models for fixed vehicle related costs, variable vehicle related costs, and driver salary related costs. There are two major factors that impact the nature of fleet costs, vehicle class & vehicle mileage.

  • Fleet Savings ReportVehicle Class – The vehicle makeup of a fleet has a big impact on its operating costs. For example, Heavy-Duty (HD) trucks have a very different CpM breakdown than Medium-Duty (MD) and Light-Duty (LD) vehicles. The Fleet Savings Summary Report segregates CpM data into three classifications: HD, MD & LD.
  • Vehicle Mileage – Just as vehicle class impacts CpM, vehicle mileage can have a large impact as well. This is true for two reasons:
    • Fixed vehicle and driver costs will be spread over less total miles.
    • Vehicles that drive fewer miles will likely spend a larger portion of their driving time on city roads rather than highways or freeways, which can increase the vehicles variable CpM.

 

In order to determine a fleets average mileage, the Fleet Savings Summary Report automatically calculates an average monthly mileage for the entire fleet, and multiplies it by 12 to get the estimated annual value.

In the next series we will discuss how we identify key opportunities for cost-savings.

Click here to request more information.

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